Seminars

2018 EAS Seminars

EAS’s Outreach Program offers four seminars essentially for high school teachers and students during the November meeting.  Each seminar has outstanding presenters from academia and industry.  The goal of each seminar is to demonstrate the advantages of a career in chemistry.   The 2018 seminar registration is free for middle & high school students with their teachers; seminars are included in the college student full registration fee of $30.  Students are encouraged to visit the Exposition after the seminar.

Prepare Your Students for General Chemistry:  A Workshop for High School Science Teachers  This seminar is for TEACHERS ONLY

Sunday, November 11, 2018
Free Registration 
1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

This workshop will be taught by Professor Gene S. Hall, Rutgers University, and other faculty from other colleges. The objective of the workshop is to assist high school teachers in preparing their students to transition to taking general chemistry at a college.  Suggestions for laboratory experiments will be presented for those school districts with challenged educational budgets.  Information on obtaining grants to purchase equipment and chemistry software will also be discussed.

Non-Destructive Forensic Examination of Banknotes and Counterfeit Consumer Products  
Monday, November 12, 2018
Registration for High School Students Required
10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This seminar will be presented by Professor Gene S. Hall, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ. Two seminars will be presented to demonstrate the exciting world of non-destructive analytical chemistry with applications in forensic science.

Presentation 1: 1764 -Time Present: The Chemistry of Paper and Plastic Banknotes as Seen Through The Eyes of an Analytical Chemist:  This presentation will focus on the chemistry of paper and plastic banknotes using non-destructive analytical techniques such as micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), micro Raman Spectroscopy, and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Mid Infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy. Professor Hall will share with the audience how non-destructive analytical chemistry was used to solve the problem of characterizing a so called “perfect counterfeit $100 bill”. Applications of Chemometrics to data interpretation will also be discussed using digital spectral libraries.  It will also be shown how these experiments can be conducted in the high school chemistry laboratory environment using inexpensive home built analytical instrumentation.

Presentation 2: Non-Destructive Analytical Instrumentation for the Characterization of Counterfeit Consumer Products:  This presentation will focus on using non-destructive analytical techniques such as micro Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), micro Raman Spectroscopy, and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Mid Infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy to characterize counterfeit consumer products. Professor Hall will share with the audience how non-destructive analytical chemistry was used to solve the problem of distinguishing between counterfeit watches, handbags, printing ink cartridges, krill oil dietary supplements, and collectors’ dolls.

Chemical Research at the Interface between Science and Art: Analytical Chemistry and Materials Science at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Registration for High School Students Required
10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

This seminar presented by Dr. Marco Leona, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY.

What have Tutankhamun funerary linens in common with Nadal socks after a Roland Garros final? What can a speck of pink tell us about the mysterious old woman depicted in a first century Roman statue? What brought more wealth to Spain than Mexican gold?  Why there were no Japanese landscape prints before 1820? Who is really responsible for Hokusai’s masterpieces?  What is the color of modernity?

The quest for beauty is a fundamental constant in human history, as well as an economic engine, and an inspiration for art and technology alike. While we easily see that the desire to produce richer and more lively images is a motivation to explore the world find and new materials (in mines or forests, or in the crucibles of the alchemist), we often overlook the science behind art.

Using advanced analytical instrumentation (Raman, X-Ray Fluorescence, Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Microscopy, Mass spectrometry), we can build a material history of art based on physical evidence gathered from masterpieces spanning four millennia, from ancient Egypt to Modernity. Twenty-first century analytical chemistry shows us that technological developments were not only readily embraced, and often prompted by artists and their audiences, but also that they in turn created new forms of expression

 Forensic Identification: Crime Scene Reconstruction and DNA Analysis 
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Registration for High School Students Required
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

This seminar, organized by Faculty of the Cedar Crest College Forensic Science Program, will walk students through a variety of crime scene related analysis as well as analysis of DNA samples collected at crime scenes.  Students will learn the basics in crime scene processing, evidence collection and bloodstain pattern analysis.  Information on modern DNA forensic analysis will be presented in order to demonstrate how DNA profiles are determined and used to aid in crime scene reconstruction.

Students and teach­ers must pre-register to reserve a space. All seminars take place in the Crowne Plaza Princeton Conference Center in Plainsboro, NJ. Please contact Eastern Analytical Symposium at askeas@eas.org or visit our website at www.EAS.org for more information. Registration will open in early July.